U.S. markets closed
  • S&P 500

    4,330.00
    -72.20 (-1.64%)
     
  • Dow Jones

    34,070.42
    -370.46 (-1.08%)
     
  • Nasdaq

    13,223.99
    -245.14 (-1.82%)
     
  • Russell 2000

    1,781.83
    -28.28 (-1.56%)
     
  • Petróleo

    89.56
    -0.07 (-0.08%)
     
  • Oro

    1,939.90
    +0.30 (+0.02%)
     
  • Plata

    23.67
    -0.01 (-0.05%)
     
  • dólar/euro

    1.0666
    -0.0001 (-0.01%)
     
  • Bono a 10 años

    4.4800
    +0.1310 (+3.01%)
     
  • dólar/libra

    1.2293
    -0.0052 (-0.42%)
     
  • yen/dólar

    147.5500
    -0.6470 (-0.44%)
     
  • Bitcoin USD

    26,575.99
    -488.75 (-1.81%)
     
  • CMC Crypto 200

    566.31
    -9.95 (-1.73%)
     
  • FTSE 100

    7,678.62
    -53.03 (-0.69%)
     
  • Nikkei 225

    32,571.03
    -452.75 (-1.37%)
     

Eli Lilly (NYSE:LLY) jumps 3.9% this week, though earnings growth is still tracking behind five-year shareholder returns

Long term investing can be life changing when you buy and hold the truly great businesses. And we've seen some truly amazing gains over the years. Don't believe it? Then look at the Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE:LLY) share price. It's 414% higher than it was five years ago. This just goes to show the value creation that some businesses can achieve. It's also good to see the share price up 39% over the last quarter.

Since the stock has added US$16b to its market cap in the past week alone, let's see if underlying performance has been driving long-term returns.

Check out our latest analysis for Eli Lilly

In his essay The Superinvestors of Graham-and-Doddsville Warren Buffett described how share prices do not always rationally reflect the value of a business. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company's share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

During five years of share price growth, Eli Lilly achieved compound earnings per share (EPS) growth of 42% per year. So the EPS growth rate is rather close to the annualized share price gain of 39% per year. This indicates that investor sentiment towards the company has not changed a great deal. Indeed, it would appear the share price is reacting to the EPS.

You can see below how EPS has changed over time (discover the exact values by clicking on the image).

earnings-per-share-growth
earnings-per-share-growth

We like that insiders have been buying shares in the last twelve months. Having said that, most people consider earnings and revenue growth trends to be a more meaningful guide to the business. Before buying or selling a stock, we always recommend a close examination of historic growth trends, available here..

What About Dividends?

As well as measuring the share price return, investors should also consider the total shareholder return (TSR). Whereas the share price return only reflects the change in the share price, the TSR includes the value of dividends (assuming they were reinvested) and the benefit of any discounted capital raising or spin-off. Arguably, the TSR gives a more comprehensive picture of the return generated by a stock. We note that for Eli Lilly the TSR over the last 5 years was 461%, which is better than the share price return mentioned above. This is largely a result of its dividend payments!

A Different Perspective

It's good to see that Eli Lilly has rewarded shareholders with a total shareholder return of 48% in the last twelve months. Of course, that includes the dividend. That gain is better than the annual TSR over five years, which is 41%. Therefore it seems like sentiment around the company has been positive lately. Someone with an optimistic perspective could view the recent improvement in TSR as indicating that the business itself is getting better with time. While it is well worth considering the different impacts that market conditions can have on the share price, there are other factors that are even more important. Even so, be aware that Eli Lilly is showing 2 warning signs in our investment analysis , you should know about...

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on American exchanges.

Have feedback on this article? Concerned about the content? Get in touch with us directly. Alternatively, email editorial-team (at) simplywallst.com.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

Join A Paid User Research Session
You’ll receive a US$30 Amazon Gift card for 1 hour of your time while helping us build better investing tools for the individual investors like yourself. Sign up here